He Moolelo Aina–Traditions And Storied Places In The District Of Ewa And Moanalua (In The District Of Kona), Island Of Oahu A Traditional Cultural Properties Study – Technical Report

In 2011, Kumu Pono Associates LLC was asked by SRI Foundation (a New Mexico firm specializing in National Historic Preservation Act/National Register compliance) to assist in preparation of A Traditional Cultural Properties (TCP) study for the proposed Honolulu Area Rapid Transit (HART)-City & County of Honolulu program, Sections 1-3 of the four section corridor, spanning the area from Honouliuli to Moanalua. The initial research identified 26 individually named places, and one multiple property feature, which could be considered as wahi pana (storied and sacred places) along sections 1-3 of the proposed route. The TCP technical report prepared by Kumu Pono Associates was in-turn used by SRI Foundation in development of the management report to determine eligibility of the identified cultural properties as TCPs and listing on the National Register. The technical report was completed in April 2012, and met with approval of the broad range of Native Hawaiian Organizations who have legal interest in or a concern about the effects of the project on National Register eligible history properties.

Kumu Pono Associated LLC incorporated a wide range of historical literature into this technical report. The information included primary Hawaiian language resources; the writings of early residents (often witnesses to some of the histories being described) pertaining to the lands of the study area; along with several significant classes of Hawaiian information, which had not been previously reviewed in project study development. This documentation included native lore, land tenure (1848-1920s), surveys (1850-1930s), testimonies of witnesses before the Boundary Commission (ca. 1860s-1920s), records of land conveyances, and historical narratives describing the land and people spanning the period from the late 1700s to the 1920s.  

In the context of Hawaiian cultural values, this study speaks the names and stories of aina (place and natural resources), akua (gods) and kanaka (people), describing the resources which sustained the lives, experiences and thoughts of those people who were, and remain a part of the land.

First and foremost, the kupuna instruct us to “aloha aina” (have love for the land). This aloha is deeply rooted in Hawaiian cosmology, genealogy, and way of life. It is expressed by in a sustainable relationship fostered in respect, speaking the names of place, passing knowledge of traditions, practices and values on to future generations, and by acting as good stewards (malama pono i ka aina). “Aloha aina” is more than words that sit on the tip of one’s tongue. It is a way of life, demonstrated in one’s relationship with, and respect for the aina (land/natural resources), and fellow man. “Aloha aina” It is reflected in the way that the land is cared for and treated.

Noted Hawaiian historian of the late 1800s, early 1900s, John Wise wrote:

“O ke Aloha o Kekahi i Kekahi — Iwaena o na la apau o ke ola ana o na kupuna o kakou i hala, kekahi mau mea ano nui loa a kakou e hoomaopopo ae ai, o ia no keia mea o ke aloha. O kekahi mea pookela loa keia iloko o keia ao nei. He lehulehu o na mana ano nui a ano kupono, ma ka nana aku, i kukuluia malalo o keia uhi o ke aloha…” (John Wise, Editor. Nupepa Kuokoa, Maraki 31, 1922:2)

Aloha for one another – Through all the days in the lives of our elders who have since passed on, one thing of the greatest importance to them, and that we know, it is this, aloha. It is one of the most significant things on all the earth. There are many examples of greatness and righteousness that can be observed, and all are founded under aloha… (Maly, translator)

Na mākou no me ke aloha a nui,

Kepā Maly,
Onaona Pomroy Maly
& Kawena Maly

To follow is full report in 5 parts. 

 

West Oahu Ethnography - Part 1

 

Ethnographic & Traditional Cultural Property Study Honouliuli to Moanalua, Oahu - Part 1 (PDF File)

 

 

West Oahu Ethnography - Part 2 (PDF)

 

Ethnographic & Traditional Cultural Property Study Honouliuli to Moanalua, Oahu - Part 2 (PDF File)

 

 

 

West Oahu Ethnography - Part 3 (PDF)

 

Ethnographic & Traditional Cultural Property Study Honouliuli to Moanalua, Oahu - Part 3 (PDF File)

 

 

West Oahu Ethnography - Part 4 (PDF) 

 

Ethnographic & Traditional Cultural Property Study Honouliuli to Moanalua, Oahu - Part 4 (PDF File)

 

West Oahu Ethnography - Part 5 (PDF)

Ethnographic & Traditional Cultural Property Study Honouliuli to Moanalua, Oahu - Part 5 (PDF File)