Cultural—Ethnographic Studies

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“Mauna Kea — Kuahiwi Ku Ha‘o I Ka Mālie” (PDF)

Report on Archival and Historical Documentary Research

Ahupua‘a of Humu‘ula and Ka‘ohe, Districts of Hilo and Hāmākua Island of Hawai‘i.


For those interested in an over view of the rich native history of Mauna Kea, the astonishing-wonderous mountain which stands there in the calm, please see the 1996 study we prepared for the Native Lands Institute. This ethnographic study was the first of several detailed investigation into the history and on-going cultural attachment of Hawaiians with Mauna Kea and the ‘āina mauna o Hawai‘i.


“Kuahiwi nani ‘oe e Mauna Kea e—

Kaulana ‘oe a puni nā moku lā e—

Hanohano no o Hawai‘i…”


March 17, 1997
 

"Mauna Kea—Ka Piko Kaulana O Ka 'Āina" (PDF)

 

(Mauna Kea—The Famous Summit Of The Land) A Collection of Native Traditions, Historical Accounts, and Oral History interviews for Mauna Kea, the Lands of Ka'ohe, Humu'ula and the 'Āina Mauna on the island of Hawai'i.

March 30, 2005

"Mauna Kea—Ka Piko Kaulana O Ka 'Āina" (PDF)

Library Selections From Kumu Pono Associates LLC

We share introductions, and full  digital copies of selected studies prepared by Kumu Pono Associates  LLC. These selections are samples of the ethnographic work we have  conducted over the years. The studies are the result of years of  research in a wide range of archival collections, both in Hawaii and on  the U.S. west coast. The studies are also a repository of traditional and  kama‘āina knowledge in the form of oral history interviews with kūpuna  and elder kama‘āina from around the islands.


In the  past, it has often been the case that individuals writing about  Hawaiian places as a part of archaeological studies, have relied on a  few historical citations, and then supposed, based on their personal  interpretations, that the history of a given area was known. It is our  belief that more detailed research in diverse historical collections,  like those found in the studies below, is important to understanding the  cultural and natural landscape of Hawaii. In our research we attempt to  delve into the depths of a wide range of historical resources. We cite  extensively, early Hawaiian accounts of native writers and other  participants in the history of Hawaii, letting them tell their stories  of place, practice, beliefs and change. Such documentation provides us  with opportunities to ensure that information important to the culture  and life style of Hawaii's people will be available for future  generations, and can be included in planning processes.

 

Within the studies are cited many records from  original Hawaiian language documents including land records and native  lore that were translated by Kepā  Maly as a part of the various studies.  There are also found oral history interviews with  kūpuna and elder kama‘āina, who shared their knowledge of place and life experiences with  us. This knowledge gives life to the traditions and landscape of Hawaii,  and is a legacy for future generations.


Studies have been uploaded at a lower resolution thus the documents and figures may not show as clearly as the normal higher resolution. 


We  request your respect of the information. Please do not cite it out of  context. And always acknowledge kūpuna, elder kama‘āina and source of  the documentation.


Aia no ke kuleana pū me ‘oe! (The responsibility is yours!)

Volume 1 (Part 1): He Wahi Mo'olelo No Kaua'ula A Me Kekāhi ‘Āina O Lahaina I Maui (PDF)

He Wahi Mo'olelo No Kaua'ula Volume 1

A collection of traditions and historical accounts of Kaua'ula and other lands of Lahaina, Maui. 

Part 1. 


June 1, 2007

Volume 1 (Part 2): He Wahi Mo‘olelo No Kaua‘ula A Me Kekāhi ‘Āina O Lahaina I Maui (PDF)

Volume 1 (Part 2): He Wahi Moolelo No Kauaula a me Kekahi Aina o Lahaina I Maui

A Collection Of Traditions And Historical Accounts Of Kaua‘ula And Other Lands Of Lahaina, Maui. 

Part 2.


May 25, 2007

He Wahi Mo‘olelo No Keauhou A Me Na Wahi Pana Ma Laila (PDF)

A collection of traditions, historical accounts and  kama‘aina recollections of Keauhou...

A collection of traditions, historical accounts and  kama‘aina recollections of Keauhou and its storied places; with notes from adjoining lands in Ka‘ū and Puna, Island of Hawai‘i.


July 23, 2005

He Mo‘olelo ‘Āina (PDF)

He Mo‘olelo ‘Āina: A Cultural Study of the Pu‘u Maka‘ala Natural Area Reserve

A Cultural Study of the Pu‘u Maka‘ala Natural Area Reserve Districts of Hilo and Puna, Island of Hawai‘i.


May 31, 2004

“Hana Ka Lima, ‘Ai Ka Waha” (PDF)

“Hana Ka Lima, ‘Ai Ka Waha”

A Collection of Historical Accounts and Oral History Interviews With Kama‘āina Residents and Fisher-People of Lands in the Halele‘a-Napali Region on the Island of Kaua‘i. 


November 10, 2003

Volume I: Ka Hana Lawai‘a A Me Nā Ko‘a O Na Kai ‘Ewalu (PDF)

A History of Fishing Practices and Marine Fisheries of the Hawaiian Islands.

A History of Fishing Practices and Marine Fisheries of the Hawaiian Islands. Compiled From: Native Hawaiian Traditions, Historical Accounts, Government Communications, Kama‘āina Testimony and Ethnography. 


August 1, 2003

Volume II — Oral History Interviews: Ka Hana Lawai‘a A Me Nā Ko‘a O Na Kai ‘Ewalu (PDF)

Oral History Interviews - Ka Hana Lawai'a

A History of Fishing Practices And Marine Fisheries Of The Hawaiian Islands.


December 10, 2003

He Mo‘olelo No Maui Hikina—Kalialinui I Uka A Me Nā ‘Āina O Lalo (PDF)

A Cultural-Historical Study of East Maui

A Cultural-Historical Study of East Maui—The Uplands of Kalialinui, and the Lands that Lie Below, Island of Maui. 


July 2, 2006

"Mauna Kea—Ka Piko Kaulana O Ka 'Āina" (PDF)

Mauna Kea Ka Piko Kaulana o ka Aina.

(Mauna Kea—The Famous Summit Of The Land) A Collection of Native Traditions, Historical Accounts, and Oral History interviews for Mauna Kea, the Lands of Ka'ohe, Humu'ula and the 'Āina Mauna on the island of Hawai'i. 


March 30, 2005

He Mo‘olelo ‘Āina — Traditions and Storied Places of Honouliuli (PDF)

He Mo‘olelo ‘Āina — Traditions and Storied Places of Honouliuli, District of ‘Ewa Island of O‘ahu

District of ‘Ewa Island of O‘ahu.(Documentary Technical Report)


October 27, 2013

Volume I Wai O Ke Ola: He Wahi Mo'olelo No Maui Hikina (PDF)

Wai o Ke Ola: He Wahi Mo'olelo No Maui Hikina Volume I

 

A collection of Native Traditions and Historical Accounts of the Lands of   
Hāmākua Poko, Hāmākua Loa and Ko‘olau, Maui Hikina (East Maui), Island of Maui. (PDF)


January 17, 2002

Volume II Wai O Ke Ola: He Wahi Mo'olelo No Maui Hikina (PDF)

Oral History Interviews with Families of  Hāmākua Poko, Hāmākua Loa and Ko‘olau, East Maui.

Oral History Interviews with Families of Hāmākua Poko, Hāmākua Loa and Ko‘olau, East Maui. 


December 1, 2007

“Hanohano Lāna‘i” – “Lāna‘i is Distinguished” (PDF)

Ethnography of Ka‘ā Ahupua‘a and the Island of Lāna‘i.

An Ethnography of Ka‘ā Ahupua‘a and the Island of Lāna‘i. 


There is a wide range of history from the island of Lāna‘i, some of which is general, but nonetheless important as it sets a foundation for delving deeper into the cultural context  and  life-ways shared between the ‘āina (land/environment) and people of Lāna‘i. The Ka‘ā study that follows additionally focuses on narratives that describe life  in  the  ahupua‘a  (traditional  land  division)  of  Ka‘ā  and  adjoining  lands,  as recounted over the generations.  


May 21, 2011

“Puna, Ka ‘Āina I Ka Hikina A Ka Lā” (PDF)

“Puna, Ka ‘Āina I Ka Hikina A Ka Lā”

A Cultural Assessment Study – Archival and Historical Documentary Research and Oral History Interviews for the Ahapua‘a of ‘Ahalanui, Laepāo‘o, and Oneloa (with Pohoiki), District of Puna, Island of Hawai‘i. 


July 31, 1998

Nā Ala Hele Ma Kai o Kohala Hema (The Coastal Trails of South Kohala) (PDF)

Nā Ala Hele Ma Kai o Kohala Hema (The Coastal Trails of South Kohala)

Archival-Historical Documentary Research, Oral History-Consultation Study, And Limited Site Preservation Plan Kawaihae-‘Anaeho‘omalu Trail Section: Lands of Kawaihae 2nd, ‘Ōuli, Lālāmilo, Waikōloa, Puakō, Waimā, Kalāhuipua‘a, and ‘Anaeho‘omalu; District of Kohala, Island of Hawai‘i. 


April 30, 1999

Ke Ala Loa-Ala Nui Aupuni Kawaihae to ‘Anaeho‘omalu, Kohala, April 30, 1999 (PDF)

Oral History Interviews - Ke Ala Loa-Alaz Nui Aupuni.

Oral History Interview Transcripts And Release Of Interview Records — South Kohala and Portions of Kekaha, North Kona (February 1998 – April 1999)


April 30, 1999

He Wahi Mo‘olelo No Punalu‘u Ma Ko‘olauloa, Mokupuni ‘O O‘ahu (PDF)

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A Collection of Traditions, Historical Accounts And Kama‘āina Recollections of Punalu‘u And Vicinity, Ko‘olauloa, Island of O‘ahu. 

 

The following collection of archival and oral historical records was compiled by Kumu Pono Associates LLC, at the request of Ms. Ulalia Woodside, Land Legacy Resources Manager (Land Assets Division), of Kamehameha Schools. The research focused on two primary sources of information—historical literature, and the results of an oral historical interview program with küpuna and kama‘äina, known to be familiar with the history of lands in Punalu‘u and vicinity of Ko‘olauloa, O‘ahu. As a result, the research brings a wide range of historical references (though not exhaustive) into one manuscript, with written accounts dating from the 1820s and oral historical accounts dating from ca. 1920. 


July 29, 2005

Appendix A Mo‘olelo ‘Ohana: (PDF)

A Collection of Kama‘āina Recollections In Oral History Interviews Of Punalu‘u.

Appendix A Mo‘olelo ‘Ohana: A Collection of Kama‘āina Recollections In Oral History Interviews Of Punalu‘u And Vicinity, Ko‘olauloa, Island Of O‘ahu. 


This collection of oral history interviews was compiled by Kumu Pono Associates LLC, at the request of Ms. Ulalia Woodside, Land Legacy Resources Manager (Land Assets Division), of Kamehameha Schools. This volume, Appendix A, accompanies a volume of detailed research in archival literature, documenting traditions and historical accounts of the lands and people of Punalu‘u and vicinity (Maly & Maly, 2005).  The oral history interviews, conducted with kupuna and kama‘āina, known to be familiar with the history of lands in Punalu‘u and vicinity of Ko‘olauloa, O‘ahu, provide readers with personal recollections and thoughts of families of the land.


November 30, 2005

He Mo‘olelo ‘Āina No Ka‘eo Me Kāhi ‘Āina E A‘E Ma Honua ‘Ula o Maui (PDF)

A Cultural-Historical Study of Ka‘eo And Other Lands In Honua‘ula, Island Of Maui

He Mo‘olelo ‘Āina No Ka‘eo Me Kāhi ‘Āina E A‘E Ma Honua ‘Ula o Maui A Cultural-Historical Study of Ka‘eo And Other Lands In Honua‘ula, Island Of Maui.

  

The following collection of archival and oral historical records was compiled by Kumu Pono Associates LLC, at the request of Sam Garcia, Jr., and Jon Garcia, owners of a 5.497 acre parcel of land, situated in the ahupua‘a (native land division) of Ka‘eo, in the Honua‘ula region of Maui (TMK 21-007:067). The Garcia parcel extends from near sea level at the shore to about fifty feet in elevation above sea level, and the family proposes to develop their five-plus acre parcel into a small subdivision, containing eleven single family residences. As a part of the planning process, a preservation plan is needed for a site identified as a heiau (temple), that is situated on the property. In addition to the heiau, stone walls, habitation features, agricultural mounds, terraces, enclosures, and modified outcrops were also identified, as a part of an archaeological survey conducted by Haun and Associates (Haun et al., 2000 & 2004). The cultural resources are interpreted as dating from the period of pre-history to historic ranching and later residency activities (Haun, 2000 & 2004; and Frampton, 2002, revised, 2004). 


December 27, 2005


Appendix A: “He Mo‘olelo ‘Āina No Ka‘eo…” (PDF)

Oral History Interviews With Kama‘āina Of The Honua‘ula Region

Appendix A: “He Mo‘olelo ‘Āina No Ka‘eo…” Oral History Interviews With Kama‘āina Of The Honua‘ula Region.

This collection of oral history interviews was compiled by Kumu Pono Associates LLC, at the request of Sam Garcia, Jr., and Jon Garcia, and accompanies a collection of historical accounts dating from the 1790s to the 1950s. The larger study was undertaken as a part of a planning and land use program for a small parcel of land which the Garcia brothers inherited from their mother, Marjorie Kalehua Cockett-Garcia. The 5.497 acre parcel of land (TMK 2-1-007:067), is situated in the ahupua‘a of Ka‘eo, in the Honua‘ula District on the island of Maui, and has been held by the family since 1956. Of particular importance to the present study, is the presence of a traditional Hawaiian site identified as “Kalani Heiau” (Site No. 196). 


March 28, 2006

Appendix B: “He Mo‘olelo ‘Āina No Ka‘eo…” (PDF)

Excerpts From Hawaiian Language Accounts.

  

Excerpts From Hawaiian Language Accounts.


Nupepa Kuokoa Ianuali 12, 1865 Ka Hoomana Kahiko, Helu II. Ua moolelo o Kane, ame kona mana, ame kana mau hana. 


Eia ka moolelo no keia mau akua, o Kane ke kaikuaana, o Kanaloa kona kaikaina, a o Kaneapua ko laua pokii. Mai Kukulu o Kahiki mai lakou, a noho ma Hawaii nei. A ua hoomanaia e ko Hawaii nei lahuikanaka, i ka wa kahiko i mau akua no lakou. Penei ka lakou hana ana: Kanu mua lakou i ka ai a o-o, ka lua a mo-a, alaila, kaumaha aku la penei. “Eia ka ai e ke akua e Kane e Kanaloa, eia ka ai, eia ka i-a, e ola ia‘u ai ka‘u mau pulapula, a kanikoo a palalauhala, i mahiai, i lawai-a, i kukulu hale nou, i kaumaha ai nau na ke akua.” 

A ina hoi he wahine, penei kana kaumaha ana, “Eia ka ai e ke akua, eia ka ai, eia ka i-a e Kane e Kanaloa, e ola ia‘u ai ka‘u mau pulapula, a kanikoo a palalauhala, i mahi ai, i lawai-a, i kuku aahu nou no ke akua, ai kaumaha ai hoi.” 


December 9, 2005

He Wahi Mo‘olelo No Ka ‘Āina A Me Nā ‘Ohana O Waiki‘i Ma Waikōloa... (PDF)

A Collection of Traditions and Historical Accounts of the Lands and Families of Waiki‘i at Waikōloa

He Wahi Mo‘olelo No Ka ‘Āina A Me Nā ‘Ohana O Waiki‘i Ma Waikōloa (Kalana o Waimea, Kohala), A Me Ka ‘Āina Mauna:


A Collection of Traditions and Historical Accounts of the Lands and Families of Waiki‘i at Waikōloa (Waimea Region, South Kohala), and the Mountain Lands, Island of Hawai‘i.


At the request of Jack McDermott (on behalf of the Waiki‘i Ranch Homeowner’s Association), Kumu Pono Associates conducted a detailed study of archival and historical literature, and oral history interviews with individuals known to be familiar with the natural and cultural landscape and history of land use in the vicinity of Waiki‘i and neighboring lands of the larger Waimea-Ka‘ohe region on the island of Hawai‘i. 


The work conducted as a part of this study included two basic components: (1) research and report findings from archival and historical literature; and (2) oral history interviews and consultation with kama‘āina (native residents) and others with knowledge of the land. In addition to pertinent materials previously collected, research specific to this study was conducted by Kumu Pono Associates from October 2001 to June 2002. Research was conducted in both public and private collections, and that documentation, cited herein, includes written narratives that cover the period from 1779 to the 1960s. 


November 12, 2002 

Appendix A—Oral History Interviews He Wahi Mo‘olelo No Ka ‘Āina A Me Nā ‘Ohana O Waiki‘i...(PDF)

A Collection of Traditions and Historical Accounts of the Lands and Families of Waiki‘i

Appendix A—Oral History Interviews He Wahi Mo‘olelo No Ka ‘Āina A Me Nā ‘Ohana O Waiki‘i Ma Waikōloa (Kalana o Waimea, Kohala), A Me Ka ‘Āina Mauna 


A Collection of Traditions and Historical Accounts of the Lands and Families of Waiki‘i at Waikōloa (Waimea Region, South Kohala), and the Mountain Lands, Island of Hawai‘i.


This collection of oral history interviews provides readers with a unique opportunity to learn about the history and cultural-historical landscape of the Waiki‘i-Ke‘āmoku vicinity, and lands of the larger Waimea region—the ‘āina mauna (mountain lands)—on the Island of Hawai‘i. Many of the kama‘āina who graciously agreed to share their histories and recollections were born and raised in the WaimeaWaiki‘i region, or have worked the land since the 1930s. One interviewee, Mrs. Elizabeth “Betty” Bowman, worked for the public school library system in the early 1940s, and shared unique recollections regarding the small public school that was operated at Waiki‘i from ca. 1912 to 1956. Several of the interviewees are descended from families who have lived in the Waimea-Waikōloa region for many generations, and all interviewees have intimate, first-hand knowledge of the land, families, ranching practices, and transitions in land use on the ranch lands. 


The interviews were conducted by Kepā Maly (Kumu Pono Associates)—some of them as a part of a study conducted at the request of the Waiki‘i Ranch Homeowner’s Association; others conducted prior to the Waiki‘i study; and still others conducted as a part of on-going research into the history of the larger ‘āina mauna. 


May 1, 2003

Proposed La‘aloa Beach Park Improvements (PDF)

La‘amilo study.

A report on: Archival-Historical Documentary Research; a limited oral history study; and archaeological site preservation plan: Proposed La‘aloa Beach Park Improvements.


Ahupua‘a of La‘aloa-iki, District of North Kona, Island of Hawai‘i (TMK:7-7-10,36)


May 27, 1997

Cultural—Ethnographic Studies — continues

He Wahi Mo‘olelo No Kaluanui Ma Ko‘olauloa, Mokupuni ‘O O‘ahu (PDF)

He Wahi Mo‘olelo No Kaluanui Ma Ko‘olauloa, Mokupuni ‘O O‘ahu

A Collection of Traditions, Historical Accounts and Kama‘āina Recollections of Kaluanui and Vicinity, Ko‘olauloa, Island of O‘ahu.

  

The following collection of archival and oral historical records was compiled by Kumu Pono Associates LLC, at the request of Mr. Jeffrey Merz, of Oceanit, on behalf of the Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of State Parks (DLNR-DSP). The present research focused on two primary sources of information—historical literature, and the results of a limited oral historical interview program with kupuna and several kama‘āina known to be familiar with the history of the lands in the Kaluanui vicinity of Kol‘olauloa, O‘ahu…


February 25, 2004


Appendix A: Kama‘aina Recollections (PDF)

Appendix A: Kama‘aina Recollections Kaluanui

Oral History Interviews For The Kaluanui & Kaliuwa‘a Vicinity – Compiled from Oral History Interviews with Kūpuna and Kama‘āina.  

  

The following collection oral historical records was compiled by Kumu Pono Associates LLC, at the request of Mr. Jeffrey Merz, of Oceanit, on behalf of the Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of State Parks (DLNR-DSP). This volume follows a detailed review and collection of historical literature, and focuses on aspects of the knowledge of kupuna (elders) and kama‘ina (those who are of the land)…


March 13, 2004. 

"Mauna Kea — Kuahiwi Ku Ha'o I Ka Mālie” (PDF)

Ahupua‘a of Humu‘ula and Ka‘ohe, Districts of Hilo and Hāmākua Island of Hawai‘i.

A Report on Archival and Historical Documentary Research. 


Ahupua‘a of Humu‘ula and Ka‘ohe, Districts of Hilo and Hāmākua Island of Hawai‘i.

  

For those interested in an over view of the rich native history of Mauna Kea, the astonishing-wonderous mountain which stands there in the calm, please see the 1996 study we prepared for the Native Lands Institute. This ethnographic study was the first of several detailed investigation into the history and on-going cultural attachment of Hawaiians with Mauna Kea and the ‘āina mauna o Hawai‘i.

“Kuahiwi nani ‘oe e Mauna Kea e—

Kaulana ‘oe a puni nā moku lā e—

Hanohano no o Hawai‘i…”


March 17, 1997
 


More Studies Will Be Added

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We will add more as we have time. Mahalo for your patience. 

More Studies Will Be Added

image16

We will add more as we have time. Mahalo for your patience.  

More Studies Will Be Added

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We will add more as we have time. Mahalo for your patience.